KIDNEY / NEPHROLOGY NEWS

Robots grow mini-organs from human stem cells

A robotic system has been developed to automate the production of human mini-organs derived from stem cells. The ability to rapidly, mass produce organoids promises to expand the use of mini-organs in basic research and drug discovery. The system was tested in producing kidney organoids, including models of polycystic kidney disease. The robots were also programmed to analyze the organoids they produced.

Hypoxia Not Linked With Nocturia

Rather intermittent oxygen desaturation was associated with a 3% greater likelihood of nocturia.

ORAL ANTIBIOTICS LINKED TO INCREASED KIDNEY STONE RISK

Highlights • Use of oral antibiotics was linked with an increased risk of developing kidney stones. • Risk decreased over time but was still elevated several years after antibiotic use. • Risk was highest for young patients. Washington, DC

Change in Red Blood Cell Distribution Width Tied With Mortality in HD

In a study, increases in red blood cell distribution width during the first year of dialysis was associated with greater risks for death.

Diabetes Ups Kidney Cancer Risk in Women

Women with type 2 diabetes have a 1.5-fold higher risk of renal cell carcinoma compared with non-diabetic women.

Increasing Water Intake Does Not Slow eGFR Decline in CKD

A nonsignificant 0.3 mL/min/1.73 m2 difference in eGFR was found between the usual and increased water intake groups after 1 year.

How a Low-Carb Diet Might Aid People With Type 1 Diabetes

Children and adults with Type 1 diabetes who followed a low-carb, high-protein diet had “exceptional” blood sugar control and low rates of complications.

Tolvaptan Cleared in US for ADPKD in Adults

Originally approved for hyponatremia, the medication is the first FDA-approved treatment for rapidly progressing autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in adults.

ASN and US Department of Health and Human Services Sign MOU to Launch Kidney Innovation Accelerator (KidneyX)

The American Society of Nephrology (ASN) is pleased to announce the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to establish the Kidney Innovation Accelerator (KidneyX). KidneyX will spur the development and commercialization of innovative technologies and therapeutics in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of kidney diseases.

New approach to treating patients with stage IV Wilms tumor

A new study shows significantly improved survival rates for patients with stage IV Wilms tumors with lung metastases.

TMVR Benefits Hold Firm in Post-Market Registry (CME/CE)

(MedPage Today) -- Do data point to a future 'transcatheter toolbox' for mitral disease?

Multivessel PCI Not Best in Cardiogenic Shock

(MedPage Today) -- Trial data show mortality disadvantage versus treating culprit lesions only

ASN 2017: The Future of Personalized Nephrology

(MedPage Today) -- Tissue engineering, drug discovery challenges among highlight topics

10 Questions to Challenge Your Medical News Savvy

(MedPage Today) -- Weekly News Quiz: October 20-26

Surgical Weight Loss; Low hs-cTNT Still Risky; VAD Before Pediatric Transplant

(MedPage Today) -- Cardiovascular Daily wraps up the top cardiology news of the week

EndoBreak: T1D and Vitamin D; VA's T2D Guideline; Oral Acromegaly Drug

(MedPage Today) -- News and commentary from the endocrinology world

For SAVR, Afternoon Tops Morning for Surgical Safety (CME/CE)

(MedPage Today) -- Circadian genes appear to interact with ischemia-reperfusion injury effects

Robotic-Assisted Surgery Adds Time, Costs Without Affecting Outcomes (CME/CE)

(MedPage Today) -- No improvements compared with laparoscopic procedures in kidney removal and rectal cancer

RAS Blockade After TAVI Tied to Better Outcomes (CME/CE)

(MedPage Today) -- Patients with severe aortic stenosis see reduced all-cause mortality

Borderline Pulmonary Hypertension Tied to Mortality Risk

(MedPage Today) -- Small increases in pressure might signal left heart failure, not early PAH

Adult diaper rash: What you need to know

While diaper rash is most common in infants, adults are also at risk of developing the condition, particularly those who wear adult diapers, incontinence briefs, or pads. In this article, we look at how to treat adult diaper rash using home remedies and explain when a person should seek medical treatment.

What to know about bladder cysts

Bladder cysts are sac-like growths filled with fluid or gas in or around the bladder. Cysts can develop anywhere on the body, and bladder cysts are not common. Bladder cysts are usually noncancerous. They can be diagnosed using ultrasound imaging. Symptoms in men and women can include painful or excessive urination.

How to identify pitting edema

Edema refers to swelling caused by excess fluid. When swollen skin remains indented after being pressed, this is called pitting edema. It is most common in the legs, ankles, and feet. Several conditions and factors, such as pregnancy, can cause pitting edema. Learn how it is identified, treated, and prevented here.

Certain antibiotics increase kidney stone risk

For the first time, researchers find a link between antibiotics and an increased risk of kidney stones. It seems that young people are most affected.

High-potassium foods to avoid with kidney disease

People with chronic kidney disease need to avoid eating potassium-rich foods. Damaged kidneys cannot process potassium properly, which can then build up in the blood and cause weakness, fatigue, and tingling. In this article, learn which high-potassium foods to avoid with kidney disease and what to replace them with.

Why does my urine feel hot?

Urine is normally warm because it comes from inside the body, which has a core temperature of 98.6°F. Hot urine occurs when urine is hotter than normal, such as during a fever, or when a person has a burning feeling while urinating. This is often caused by an infection, and the causes can differ between men and women.

Can essential oils treat a UTI?

Essential oils are popular home remedies for many ailments, but can they help to relieve the symptoms of a UTI? In this article, we look at the essential oils that may be best able to fight bacteria, including cinnamon, oregano, and lavender. Here, learn about potential risks and how to use these oils safely.

Why all men 'should be concerned about declining testosterone'

A new study finds a strong link between low total testosterone and chronic diseases in men of all ages, especially in the under-40 and 60-plus age groups.

Why does my urine smell like coffee?

A person’s health and diet can impact the smell of their urine. Urine that smells like coffee can be caused by a person drinking too much coffee. Dehydration and pregnancy can also heighten the smell of urine. In this article, we discuss the range of causes for urine that smells like coffee, as well as treatments.

Why does my urine smell like fish?

A person’s urine can smell like fish if they take certain medications or supplements. Some diets and pregnancy can also cause this symptom. However, it may instead indicate a bacterial infection such as cystitis, or kidney or liver damage. In this article, we cover the causes, prevention, and treatment of this symptom.

HYPERTENSION NEWS

High blood pressure? Drinking kefir could lower it

Kefir, a fermented milk drink, is known for its probiotic properties that help to rebalance gut bacteria. But how can this influence blood pressure?

Pancreatic cancer: Some blood pressure drugs put women at risk

A new study reveals that certain blood pressure drugs are linked with a high risk of pancreatic cancer among postmenopausal women.

How long can a person live with congestive heart failure?

Congestive heart failure is a progressive disease that causes the heart to weaken, making it difficult to pump blood around the body. In this article, we look at the symptoms, stages, and life expectancy of congestive heart failure. We also look at treatment options, including lifestyle changes and surgery.

How music helps the heart find its beat

A new study shows that listening to music can intensify the beneficial effects of hypertension medication in people with high blood pressure.

What is serum cholesterol?

Serum cholesterol is a measurement of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, which is considered good, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, which is considered bad, and triglycerides. A person's serum cholesterol level can help to determine whether they should change their diet or lifestyle. Learn more here.

This gene ups sugar intake but lowers body fat

One gene variant makes us eat more sugary foods but causes our overall body fat levels to be lower. Is this really as good for our health as it sounds?

How do you check your own blood pressure?

It is common to have your blood pressure checked at the doctor's office, but there are many cases where it is important to monitor it at home. It is easy to check blood pressure with an automated machine, but it can also be done manually at home. Learn how to check your own blood pressure and what the results mean.

A noisy workplace might affect your heart

Occupational noise is an important health hazard linked to a heightened risk of hearing loss. It can also endanger the heart, finds a new study.

Could grilling your meat raise blood pressure?

Researchers suggest that regular consumption of grilled or barbecued meat or fish could raise the risk of developing high blood pressure.

Low-calorie sweeteners may promote metabolic syndrome

New research now suggests that low-calorie sweeteners may actually help to increase fat formulation and lead to metabolic syndrome.

GENERAL MEDICAL NEWS

CDC issues alert re warfarin coagulopathy and synthetic cannabinoids

CDC: What Do Health Care Providers Need To Do? ............ Healthcare providers should maintain a high index of suspicion for vitamin K-dependent antagonist coagulopathy in patients with a history of synthetic cannabinoids (e.g., K2, Spice, and AK47) use:.................Presenting with clinical signs of coagulopathy, bleeding unrelated to an injury, or bleeding without another explanation; some patients may not divulge use of synthetic cannabinoids...................Presenting with complaints unrelated to bleeding (e.g., appendicitis).

Renal Disease and Electrolyte Course, Aspen, CO; July 23-27, 2018

University of Colorado: Registration: To register visit http://medschool.ucdenver.edu/cme or contact Pam Welker at (303)724-3551 or at pam.welker@ucdenver.edu

USRDS Annual Report 2017

USRDS: US Renal Data System 2017 Annual Data Report: Epidemiology of Kidney Disease in the United States

In ICU, Ringer's lactate also better than saline.

NEJM: Conclusions: Among critically ill adults, the use of balanced crystalloids for intravenous fluid administration resulted in a lower rate of the composite outcome of death from any cause, new renal-replacement therapy, or persistent renal dysfunction than the use of saline.

Ringer's lactate causes less kidney injury than saline.

NEJM: Balanced crystalloids resulted in a lower incidence of major adverse kidney events within 30 days than saline (4.7% vs. 5.6%; adjusted odds ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.70 to 0.95; P=0.01).

Lp(a) in the news in the New York Times

NY Times (Anahad O'Connor): “Only a small percentage of physicians know about this,” she said. “The biggest challenge for patients is finding knowledgeable physicians who know about this and can help them.”

Inhibitors of NMMT reduce obesity by increasing fat cell metabolism.

Biochem Pharmacol (Neelakantan et al): Research scientists at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston say they developed a promising new drug that curbs obesity without dieting and, based upon preliminary study findings, they may be on their way to unleashing a breakthrough for the millions who struggle with their weight. "Treatment of diet-induced obese mice systemically with a potent NNMT inhibitor significantly reduced body weight and white adipose mass, decreased adipocyte size, and lowered plasma total cholesterol levels. Notably, administration of NNMT inhibitors did not impact total food intake nor produce any observable adverse effects."

J-curve in BP studies is an artifact - similar to dose targeting bias in HEMO.

Circulation (Kalkman et al): Conclusions: Low on-treatment SBP levels are associated with increased cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. This association is independent of the attained blood pressure level because the J curve aligns with the SBP target. Our results suggest that the benefit or risk associated with intensive blood pressure–lowering treatment can be established only via randomized clinical trials.

Toxic algae now a nationwide threat.

AP: MONROE, Mich. (AP) — Competing in a bass fishing tournament two years ago, Todd Steele cast his rod from his 21-foot motorboat — unaware that he was being poisoned. A thick, green scum coated western Lake Erie. And Steele, a semipro angler, was sickened by it.

HDCN server move still in progress

We are still in the process of moving our sever. The CME and CEU certificates don't yet work, so please hold off in taking any tests on the site. The old audio files from ASN and other meetings should work now. Suggest you use VLC player to access them -- even the old Windows Media player files as well as the Real Media files open well using this player. Get the VLC player at https://www.videolan.org/vlc/.

US poison control centers receive 29 calls per day about children exposed to ADHD medications

(Nationwide Children's Hospital) The study found that there were more than 156,000 calls to US Poison Control Centers regarding exposures to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications among children and adolescents 19 years of age and younger from January 2000 through December 2014, averaging 200 calls each week or 29 calls per day.

Fewer men are being screened, diagnosed, and treated for prostate cancer

(Wiley) A new study reveals declines in prostate cancer screening and diagnoses in the United States in recent years, as well as decreases in the use of definitive treatments in men who have been diagnosed.

One in 10 parents say their child has gotten sick from spoiled or contaminated food

(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Few parents are using some simple strategies to protect kids from food poisoning outside the home, such as at a potluck or restaurant, according to a new report from C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at the University of Michigan.

Technique shows promise for reconstruction of airway following surgery

(JAMA Network) An early study suggests it may be feasible to use human aortic grafts preserved by freezing to rebuild windpipe and airway sections removed because of disease.

Infection blood test of limited value in reducing antibiotic use

(University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences) Overall antibiotic use was not curbed by giving physicians the results of biomarker tests in patients with suspected lower respiratory tract infections, according to findings from the Procalcitonin Antibiotic Consensus Trial.

Nanoparticles derived from tea leaves destroy lung cancer cells: Quantum dots have great potential

(Swansea University) Nanoparticles derived from tea leaves inhibit the growth of lung cancer cells, destroying up to 80 percent of them, new research by a joint Swansea University and Indian team has shown. The team made the discovery while they were testing out a new method of producing a type of nanoparticle called quantum dots. These are tiny particles which measure less than 10 nanometers. A human hair is 40,000 nanometers thick.

Improving heart health could prevent frailty in old age

(University of Exeter) The largest study of its kind, led by the University of Exeter, found that even small reductions in risk factors helped to reduce frailty, as well as dementia, chronic pain, and other disabling conditions of old age.

Exercise to stay young: 4-5 days a week to slow down your heart's aging

(The Physiological Society) Participating in exercise 4-5 days per week is necessary to keep your heart young, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology. These findings could be an important step to develop exercise strategies to slow down such aging.

Brain stimulation may reduce food cravings as obesity treatment

(European Society of Endocrinology) Stimulating the brain to alter its intrinsic reward system shows promise in the treatment of obesity, according to results presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. The technique has yielded positive results after just a single treatment session, revealing its potential to become a safer alternative to treat obesity, avoiding invasive surgery and drug side effects.

Larger waistlines are linked to higher risk of vitamin D deficiency

(European Society of Endocrinology) Higher levels of belly fat are associated with lower vitamin D levels in obese individuals, according to data presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. The study reports that vitamin D levels are lower in individuals with higher levels of belly fat, and suggests that individuals, particularly the overweight with larger waistlines should have their vitamin D levels checked, to avoid any potentially health damaging effects.